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Privacy & Security

Security & Fraud Prevention

Cryptocurrency Wallet Scams

Another great article from our friends on KnowBe4's Security Team

Cryptocurrency exchanges are platforms that allow you to buy and sell cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin. When you buy cryptocurrency, it’s stored in a digital wallet. Most cryptocurrency exchanges require that you use an additional authentication method, such as a recovery phrase, to access your wallet. Cybercriminals use social engineering to try to bypass this added authentication and steal your currency

In a new scam, cybercriminals send you an email pretending to be a cryptocurrency exchange representative. This email states that you need to provide information to receive a refund due to an issue with your account. To receive this refund, this email asks you to click a link and enter your recovery phrase. If you click the link and provide this information, cybercriminals can use it to reset your password and prevent you from accessing your account. Then, they can transfer your currency to their own accounts.

Follow the tips below to stay safe from similar scams:

    • Never trust that an account is legitimate because it has a verification checkmark.  Anyone can subscribe to Twitter Blue.
    • Verify news and information by checking official websites, press releases, and other trusted sources.
    • Never provide sensitive information through Twitter.  If an account asks you to provide information, contact the individual or organization directly by using their official email or phone number.

    Twitter Blue Scams

    Another great article from our friends on KnowBe4's Security Team

    Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla, recently purchased the social media platform Twitter. Since this purchase, Twitter started allowing users to pay for a monthly subscription called “Twitter Blue.” Twitter Blue displays a blue verification checkmark next to the subscriber’s username. Previously, Twitter only gave this checkmark to accounts that belonged to legitimate public figures, brands, or governments.

    Cybercriminals are taking advantage of this new subscription to make fake accounts appear more legitimate. They’re creating accounts to impersonate public figures or brands so they can spread disinformation or pretend to be customer support. Be cautious of Twitter Blue subscribers that ask you to perform an action or provide sensitive information. These accounts could be cybercriminals that are trying to manipulate you.

    Follow the tips below to stay safe from Twitter Blue scams:

      • Always be cautious of unexpected emails. While this attack targets cryptocurrency wallets, similar emails could be used to gain access to any account that uses additional authentication methods.
      • Watch out for messages that offer refunds or special promotions that seem too good to be true. Phishing attacks rely on impulsive actions, so always think before you click. 
      • Never provide sensitive information through email.  If you receive an email claiming that you have an account issue, always log into the organization's website directly to verify the claim.

          The KnowBe4 Security Team    

        Keeping Your Passwords Squeaky Clean

        Another great article from our friends on KnowBe4's Security Team

        Did you know that the average person uses the same three to seven passwords to log in to over 170 online accounts? In addition to being reused, these passwords are often weak and can be easily guessed by cybercriminals. If cybercriminals guess these passwords, they could access the majority of their victim’s online accounts. Even worse, the victim may not know that their password has been compromised for several months or years. To keep your passwords squeaky clean and safe from cybercriminals, follow the tips below:

        Create Strong Passwords

        Creating strong passwords helps prevent cybercriminals from gaining access to your online accounts. Your passwords should be as long, complex, and random as possible. While many websites only require passwords to be eight characters long, we recommend making your password at least 12 characters long. You should also include a combination of lowercase and uppercase letters, numbers, and symbols in your password. To keep your accounts extra safe, you can use password phrases, or passphrases. However, when you create your password or passphrase, make sure that you don’t use any personal information that a cybercriminal could guess.

        Don't Reuse Passwords

        Reusing passwords for your online accounts may be convenient, but it’s also risky. If you reuse passwords, you could be at risk of having multiple accounts compromised at once. If a cybercriminal guesses your password, they could access multiple accounts instead of just one account. Cybercriminals can also sell passwords or make them available online. Creating a unique password for each online account reduces the risk if one of your passwords is compromised.

        Use a Password Manager

        You’re probably wondering how you are supposed to remember long, complex passwords for all of your online accounts. The answer is a password manager. You can use password managers to securely store all of your passwords. Instead of having to remember passwords for every online account, you only have to remember one password for your password manager. In addition to storing your passwords, many password managers can also generate passwords for you based on specific criteria.

        Use Multi-Factor Authentication

        You can also use multi-factor authentication (MFA) to secure your online accounts, if available. MFA requires multiple forms of authentication, such as a password and a code from your smartphone or a USB smart key. By requiring you to use multiple forms of authentication, cybercriminals will have a harder time gaining access to your account, even if your password is compromised.

        Nobody wants cybercriminals to guess their passwords. To keep your passwords squeaky clean and safe, remember to create strong passwords, avoid reusing passwords, and use a password manager or MFA, if possible.                 

         

        The KnowBe4 Security Team                 

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